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How Britain Got The Blues     
8CD set       R016
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R005 How Britain Got The Blues 1

Rhythm & Blues Records presents a new series of double CDs highlighting the 240 or so songs most frequently performed by British beat and blues artists. Volume One spotlights the pre-Beatles skiffle and folk era and ties this in to the Blues Boom group material of the late 1960s. Three further volumes concentrate on Merseybeat, the London scene and the jazz and soul sounds that influenced the mod movement. In the late 1960s, when US college youth were likely to buy anything British labelled ‘heavy', ‘progressive' or  ‘blues', the brand-leaders of the British Invasion: The Rolling Stones, Fleetwood Mac, Cream, Ten Years After, The Jeff Beck Group and Led Zeppelin were, without exception, born out of the American music included in this fascinating collection.

Teenagers in post-war America weren't particularly fond of folk, blues or country and western; that was the stuff that their parents liked. Yet to some of their counterparts in ration-book Britain, this music seemed to offer messages from an intriguing culture half a world away. Lonnie Donegan's hit album 'King of Skiffle' engendered a craze among British teenagers for reproducing and even recording these sounds in their suburban bedrooms or provincial youth clubs, on cheap guitars and homemade instruments. The skiffle sound spread like wildfire across the UK before its more discerning practitioners reverted, towards a more rock 'n' roll style, taking their fusion back to North America whence it had come, in a 'British Invasion'.

DISC ONE SKIFFLE, FOLK, ROCK'N'ROLL

1. Downbound Train Chuck Berry
2. Rock Island Line Leadbelly
3. Long Gone Lost John Papa Charlie Jackson
4. See See Rider Ray Charles
5. Tobacco Road John D. Loudermilk
6. Backwater Blues Bessie Smith
7. Leaving Blues Leadbelly
8. Midnight Hour Blues Leroy Carr
9. Sportin' Life Blues Brownie McGhee
10. Cumberland Gap   Frank Hutchison
11. Matchbox Carl Perkins
12. This Train Sister Rosetta Tharpe
13. Riot In Cell Block No. 9 The Robins
14. Ain't Nobody's Business Jimmy Witherspoon
15. Slippin' & Slidin' Little Richard
16. Sea Cruise Huey 'Piano' Smith & His Clowns
17. Sweet Little Sixteen Chuck Berry
18. Midnight Special Big Bill Broonzy
19. Pick a Bale of Cotton Leadbelly
20. San Francisco Bay Blues Ramblin' Jack Elliott
21. Stack O'Lee Mississippi John Hurt
22. Boll Weevil Song Woody Guthrie
23. Take This Hammer Leadbelly
24. Diggin My Potatoes Washboard Sam
25. Going Down Slow Jimmy Cotton
26. Chills & Fever Johnny Love & His Orchestra
27. Rock Island Line Kelly Pace

DISC TWO BRITISH BLUES BOOM

1. Cat Squirrel Dr. Isaiah Ross
2. Shake Your Money Maker Elmore James
3. Spoonful Howlin' Wolf
4. Steppin' Out Memphis Slim
5. Messin' With The Kid Junior Wells
6. Hide Away Freddie King
7. Rollin' And Tumblin' Muddy Waters
8. Gallis Pole Leadbelly
9. Mean Ol' Frisco Arthur Crudup
10. Cross Road Blues Robert Johnson
11. Outside Woman Blues Blind Joe Reynolds
12. How Many More Years Howlin' Wolf
13. I'm So Glad Skip James
14. It Hurts Me Too Tampa Red
15. Love In Vain Robert Johnson
16. Mean Old World T-Bone Walker
17. Need You Love So Bad Little Willie John
18. Sitting On Top Of The World Howlin' Wolf
19. Lawdy Mama Freddie King
20. From Four Until Late Robert Johnson
21. Reconsider Baby Lowell Fulsom
22. Key To The Highway Bill "Jazz" Gillum
23. Eyesight To The Blind Sonny Boy Williamson
24. I Can't Quit You Baby Otis Rush
25. The Thrill Is Gone Roy Hawkins
26. Rock Me Baby B.B. King
27. Sweet Home Chicago Robert Johnson
28. First Time I Met The Blues Buddy Guy
29. Double Trouble Otis Rush

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R006 How Britain Got The Blues 2

Rhythm & Blues Records presents a new series of double CDs highlighting the 240 or so songs most frequently performed by British beat and blues groups. Volume Two spotlights Merseybeat. Volume One concentrates on the pre-Beatles skiffle and folk era and ties this in to the Blues Boom group material of the late 1960s. Two further volumes concentrate on the London scene and the jazz and soul sounds that influenced the mod movement. Teenagers in post-war America weren't particularly fond of folk, blues or country and western; that was the stuff that their parents liked. Yet to some of their counterparts in ration-book Britain, this music seemed to offer messages from an intriguing culture half a world away. Lonnie Donegan's hit album 'King of Skiffle' engendered a craze among British teenagers for reproducing and even recording these sounds in their suburban bedrooms or provincial youth clubs, on cheap guitars and homemade instruments. The skiffle sound spread like wildfire across the UK before its more discerning practitioners reverted, towards a more rock 'n' roll style, taking their fusion back to North America whence it had come, in a 'British Invasion'. Although this Merseybeat collection fits happily into the series, How Britain Got The Blues, and will help to show how the UK moved from Bert Weedon to Eric Clapton, its contents are not hardcore blues as that music bypassed Liverpool. The Rolling Stones in London, the Animals in Newcastle and several other bands were strongly influenced by the likes of Howlin' Wolf and John Lee Hooker, but it didn't happen in Liverpool. When Muddy Waters opened the Mardi Gras club in the city centre in 1958, the audience was not one of young beat musicians but of older jazzmen. Although all the top Liverpool bands made records in the key years of 1963 and 1964, not one of them recorded standard 12-bar blues where the first three lines are the same and the payoff comes in the fourth. The reason is simple. The Mersey groups, led by the Beatles, favoured the rock'n'roll classics, contemporary black R&B and the songs that were currently coming out of the Brill Building. Professional songwriters were writing for the black groups of the day such as the Drifters and the Coasters.

Disc1

1. That's Alright Arthur Crudup
2. Baby Let's Play House Arthur Gunther
3. Red Hot Billy Emerson
4. Guitar Boogie Arthur Smith
5. Lawdy Miss Clawdy Elvis Presley
6. Rock & Roll Music Chuck Berry
7. Take Out Some Insurance Jimmy Reed
8. Hallelujah I Love Her So Ray Charles
9. Rip It Up Little Richard
10. Love Potion No. 9 The Clovers
11. I'm Gonna Sit Right Down  Elvis Presley
12. Nothin' Shakin'  Eddie Fontaine
13. Hippy Hippy Shake Chan Romero
14. One Night Smiley Lewis
15. Money Barrett Strong
16. Long Tall Sally Little Richard
17. Around And Around Chuck Berry
18. Shout, Pts.1 & 2 Isley Brothers
19. Slow Down Larry Williams
20. Young Blood The Coasters
21. Roll Over Beethoven Chuck Berry
22. Respectable The Isley Brothers
23. Leave My Kitten Alone Little Willie John
24. No Other Baby The Vipers
25. Broken Arrow Chuck Berry
26. Peter Gunn Duane Eddy
27. All Around The World Little Richard
28.Dizzy, Miss Lizzy Larry Williams
29. Reelin' and Rockin' Chuck Berry

Disc 2:

1. You’re No Good Dee Dee Warwick
2. Shake Sherrie The Contours
3. Stupidity Solomon Burke
4. Something You Got Chris Kenner
5. Watch Your Step Bobby Parker
6. Fortune Teller Benny Spellman
7. Bye Bye Baby Mary Wells
8. Nobody But Me The Isley Brothers
9. You Can't Judge A Book  Bo Diddley
10. I'm Talking About You Chuck Berry
11. Twist And Shout The Isley Brothers
12. Just A Little Bit Rosco Gordon
13. Some Other Guy Ritchie Barrett
14. I Know Barbara George
15. What'd I Say Pts 1 & 2 Ray Charles
16. If You Gotta Make A Fool  James Ray
17. You Really Got A Hold On Me The Miracles
18. Shimmy Shimmy Bobby Freeman
19. Bye Bye Johnny Chuck Berry
20. New Orleans Gary U.S. Bonds
21. Sho' Know A Lot About Love Hollywood Argyles
22. Bumble Bee Lavern Baker
23. Memphis Chuck Berry
24. A Shot Of Rhythm And Blues Arthur Alexander
25. A Mess of Blues Elvis Presley
26. I Can Tell Bo Diddley
27. It's Love That Really Counts The Shirelles
28. Sugar Babe Buster Brown
29. Bring It On Home To Me Sam Cooke


Britain Got Blues 3

R013 How Britain Got The Blues 3

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‘I hope they don’t think we’re a rock and roll outfit,’ Mick Jagger declared to Jazz News in 1962. He was speaking to – and for – a growing number of R&B and trad jazz aficionados among the more discerning British youth who were seeking musical authenticity and distancing themselves from the teenybop crowd, thanks to music imported by their elders in the folk movement.

Other routes into these new genres were opened as some teenagers learned the guitar during the skiffle craze, others listened to the US military’s radio which played R&B for the black soldiers stationed around London and some, inspired by Chuck Berry and Buddy Holly, wanted to dig deeper to discover the sources of their heroes’ inspiration. What brought them together around London was their youth, their money and their social status. Unlike musicians in industrial cities like Liverpool, Newcastle or Belfast, most of these kids came from comparatively comfortable middle-class backgrounds – they were well educated and they didn’t have to bring home the bacon at the age of 16, but they did have a disposable income to spend on records, guitars and amplifiers.

1962-1964 was the boom period for the London R&B scene and British music has never looked back. This compilation presents the most influential blues records that were adopted by artists performing at this exciting time.

Disc1

1. You Don't Love Me Willie Cobbs
2. Who Do You Love Bo Diddley
3. Wang Dang Doodle Howlin' Wolf
4. Pretty Thing Bo Diddley
5. You Can't Catch Me Chuck Berry
6. Boom Boom John Lee Hooker
7. Little Bitty Pretty One Thurston Harris
8. Cops And Robbers Boogaloo
9. Got My Mojo Working Muddy Waters
10. Susie Q Dale Hawkins
11. Smoke Stack Lightnin' Howlin' Wolf
12. Milk Cow Blues Ricky Nelson
13. Fannie Mae Buster Brown
14. Cadillac Bo Diddley
15. My Baby Left Me Arthur Crudup
16. Baby Please Don't Go Big Joe Williams
17. Baby, What You Want Me To Do Jimmy Reed
18. Catfish Blues Robert Petway
19. I Hear You Knocking Smiley Lewis
20. Big Boss Man Jimmy Reed
21. I Wish You Would Billy Boy Arnold
22. You'll Be Mine Howlin' Wolf
23. Beautiful Delilah Chuck Berry
24. I Like It Like That, Part 1 Chris Kenner
25. Dust My Blues Elmore James
26. Bright Lights, Big City Jimmy Reed
27. I'm Your Hoochie Coochie Man Muddy Waters
28. Baby, Let Me Follow You Down Bob Dylan
29. Dimples John Lee Hooker
30. Too Much Monkey Business Chuck Berry

Disc 2:

1. The Red Rooster-Howlin' Wolf
2. This May Be The Last Time-The Staple Singers
3. Route 66-Chuck Berry
4. I'm A King Bee -Slim Harpo
5. Ain't That Lovin' You Baby-Jimmy Reed
6. Oh Yea-Bo Diddley
7. Bottle It Up and Go-Tommy McClennan
8. Call It Stormy Monday-T-Bone Walker
9. Confessin' The Blues-Jay McShann
10. Five Long Years-Eddie Boyd
11. I Just Want To Make Love-Muddy Waters
12. Someday Baby Blues-Sleepy John Estes
13. Nine Below Zero-Sonny Boy Williamson
14. Mannish Boy-Muddy Waters
15. I'm A Man-Bo Diddley
16. Carol-Chuck Berry
17. Every Day I Have The Blues-B.B. King
18. Honest I Do-Jimmy Reed
19. Here 'Tis-Bo Diddley
20. Not Fade Away-The Crickets
21. Down The Road A Piece-Will Bradley
22. Louie, Louie-Richard Berry
23. Bald Headed Woman-Odetta
24. I Ain't Got You-Billy Boy Arnold
25. House Of The Risin' Sun -Bob Dylan
26. Johnny B Goode-Chuck Berry
27. My Girl Josephine-Fats Domino
28. Little Queenie-Chuck Berry

Britain Got Blues 4

R014 How Britain Got The Blues 4
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England. 1960. A new decade has dawned, but parents are breathing a sigh of relief as normality is restored. Only a few years ago, teenage menace had arrived on the back of Bill Haley and Elvis Presley. Cinemas were smashed, and juvenile delinquency soared, but now the flames of a rock’n’roll revolution have been quelled. Buddy Holly is dead. Elvis has been tamed by the army and is singing ballads. Chuck Berry is in jail. Tommy Steele and Cliff Richard have gone showbiz. Record sales are starting to fall as teenagers grow bored. Small cliques, usually art student types, are demanding something more exclusive. Skiffle comes and goes, replaced by trad jazz, then folk. The music scene seems tame in comparison to the late 50’s and something pretty spectacular is needed.
In 1962, four working class lads from Liverpool blow things wide open. Playing a mixture of rock’n’roll and R&B, they give British youth something to think about. Ian ‘Sammy’ Samwell is first to play Love Me Do. Sammy is spinning discs at the Lyceum in London with a playlist of mainly imported American R&B. He is soon joined behind the decks by Jeff Dexter and between them they turn the Lyceum on the Strand into the first bona fide club for the emerging mod scene.

Here are some of those seminal records lovingly collected, together with notes by Smiler Anderson

Disc1

1. Rockhouse Ray Charles
2. Mashed Potatoes U.S.A. James Brown
3. One Mint Julep Sarah Vaughan
4. Lipstick Traces  Benny Spellman
5. Wade In The Water Johnny Griffin
6. Get On The Right Track Ray Charles
7. Parchman Farm Mose Allison
8. Night Train James Brown
9. Ooh Poo Pah Doo, Pt 1 Jessie Hill
10. Land Of 1000 Dances Chris Kenner
11. Come On, Pts. 1 & 2 Earl King
12. Sack Of Woe Ray Bryant Combo
13. Watermelon Man Mongo Santamaria
14. She Put The Hurt On Me Prince La La
15. The Seventh Son Mose Allison
16. Last Night The Mar-Keys
17. Sticks And Stones Ray Charles
18. Point of No Return Gene McDaniels
19. Shout and Shimmy James Brown
20. Shop Around The Miracles
21. Green Onions Booker T. & The MG's
22. Do Re Mi Lee Dorsey
23. Work Song Oscar Brown Jr.
24. Eso Beso  Paul Anka
25. I Believe To My Soul Ray Charles
26. I Don't Mind James Brown
27. Hitch Hike Marvin Gaye
28. Gin House Blues Nina Simone

Disc 2:

1. The Train Kept A Rollin' Johnny Burnette
2. I'm A Lover Not A Fighter Lazy Lester
3. I'm A Hog For You The Coasters
4. Jaguar And The Thunderbird Chuck Berry
5. She Said Yeah Larry Williams
6. You Need Love Muddy Waters
7. Mess Around Ray Charles
8. Daddy Rollin' Stone Otis Blackwell
9. Good Morning Schoolgirl Don & Bob
10. A Certain Girl Ernie K-Doe
11. Kansas City Wilbert Harrison
12. Looking Back Johnny Guitar Watson
13. My Babe Little Walter
14. Doctor Feelgood Dr Feelgood
15. Poison Ivy The Coasters
16. Road Runner Bo Diddley
17. You Better Move On Arthur Alexander
18. Do You Love Me The Contours
19. Bring It to Jerome Bo Diddley
20. Don't You Lie To Me Chuck Berry
21. (Night Time Is) The Right Time Ray Charles
22. Blue Monday Fats Domino
23. Rockin’ Pneumonia Huey 'Piano' Smith
24. A Young Man  Mose Allison
25. Little Egypt The Coasters
26. C.C. Rider Chuck Willis
27. Casting My Spell Johnny Otis
28. I Put A Spell On You Screamin' Jay Hawkins
29. Let The Good Times Roll Louis Jordan
30. Any Day Now Chuck Jackson
31. Air Travel Ray & Bob
32. I've Got Love If You Want It Slim Harpo


 
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